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"Absolutely Negative": The End of a Much-Vaunted Zeppelin

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HE N L R .. ý ý- k M*r {‘: y·p r b the wid t hednero ls ndpopry mah. g ,z^ .:ý, M” r” P rý ·;;·w ‘kI- ~ – it r y1. Y SY tv n. e HER NAVAL AIR-SHIPS: THE BROKEN-BACKED “L 3” ON FANOEE ISLAND SHORTLY BEFORE TH “4 ONE OF THE TWO RECENT DISASTERS SAID TO HAVE DEPRIVED GERMANY OF THE LAST OF SNOW ON HER ENVELOPE. FELL UNDER THE W EIGHT OF was soon” afterwards in flames. According to one account, the Captain set it on fire to prevent it from being carried away by the wind, to the dang~er of life and property Thr ~rt ieo


In an official note issued recently in Paris some interesting observations were made on the situation as regards air-craft in the war during the last few weeks. “As for the Zeppelins,” it is stated, ” their action remains absolutely negative. As a result of the recent disaster to the dirigibles ‘ L 3 ‘ and ‘ L 4,’ Germany has lost all the naval types of air-ships which she possessed before the war. It may be recalled that ‘ LI ‘ disappeared in a storm on September 9 last, and that ‘ L 2 ‘ was destroyed by fire on October 17.” The ” L I ” was blown into the sea near Heligoland, and the ” L 2 ” was burnt at Johannisthal. The accidents which resulted in the destruction of ” L 3 ” and ” L 4 ” occurred off the coast of Denmark within a few hours of each other on February 17. The ” L 3 ” was the first to come to grief. She had, it is said, left Hamburg at 4 a.m., and was cruising off the Danish coast when her motors failed, and about 6 p.m. she crashed on to the beach of Fanoe Island, snapping in two as she struck the ground The crew of two officers and fourteen petty-officers escaped unhurt, and sore interned. The air-ship


was soon afterwards in flames. According to one account, the Captain set it on fire to prevent it from being carried away by the wind, to the danger of life and property The great size of the dirigible may be realised by comparing it with that of the two men seen on the left ” the photograph. The “L 3,” which weighed twenty-seven tons, was launched only last year. The disaster to the ” L 4 ” occurred the same night, and in the same neighbourhood- -that is, off the west coast of Denmark. In her case, the air-ship is said to have been brought down by the weight of the snow that had fallen upon her. It has been said that a layer of snow equal to 1-25th of an inch of water on the surface of a Zeppelin would have a weight of four tons, and would inevitably bring down the vessel. Four of the crew of the “L 4 ” are said to have been drowned or carried away in the air-ship, which drifted out to sea. The survivors both of ‘L 3 ” and “L 4,” it was reported, would be interned at Odense. Two machine-guns and four large bombs are said to have been removed from “L ý.”



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Issue 0. - Vol error

Mar, 06 1915

Illustrated London News