Home Archive Search Result Action Leading up to the Fall of Antwerp: An Artillery Duel across a Cathedral City

Action Leading up to the Fall of Antwerp: An Artillery Duel across a Cathedral City

ORIGINAL WEB VERSION
Close Comments

Leave a Comment

This 'web version' uses Optical Character Recognition (OCR), to interpret the original printed copy and convert it to computer-readable text. This technology can result in text errors.

Since the Germans snvaded Belgium there has been much fighting at Malines, whose fine cathedral has suffered a good deal of damage from German shells. It was stated on August 27 that, after a magnificent defence of two days by the Belgian Army, Malines had been retaken by the Germans. The first German bombardment, it is said, lasted for forty minutes, and many of the public buildings were hit. On the next morning it was renewed for four hours, and most of the population fled. Antwerp was the objective of the German advance, which at that time was checked by the Belgians. King Albert was reported to have been present at the first bombardment of Malines, which, it was said, made him so indignant that he vowed to fight the Germans to the last. On September 19 it was stated that Malines was again in the possession of the Belgians. On September 26 the Germans advanced in force towards

Anterp, and Malies became unteabe. The net day, after another bombardment, the German again occupied it, and thence developed the attack on Antwerp. Our drawing illustrates an artillery action across the River Dyle, and German shells are seen coming over Malines from artillery posted beyond it, to the right in the drawing. On the left is a battery of Belgian howttzers in action, with a big German shell, one of those nicknamed “Jack Johnson ” by the British troops, bursting close to them and not very far from an ambulance where Red Cross nurses are tending the wounded. Belgian infantry are posted along the line of the river. In the air to the left are two German observation – balloons, one just struck and brought down by the Belgian shell-fire. Similar balloons were used by the Germans later at Antwerp, and one of them was brought down by a British naval gun.


Our address

GPS:
51.2194480, 4.4024640
Close Comments

Leave a Comment