Home Archive Search Result An Advance in Progress: How Ground is Gainel from the Enemy—Photographs from the French Front

An Advance in Progress: How Ground is Gainel from the Enemy—Photographs from the French Front

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-…… ._ ,—– —.—- —– – – rý Ii ! , INFANTRY SUPPORTING TROOPS ON THE MOVE FORWARD : MARCHING ALONG AN EXPOSED ROADWAY IN OPEN ORDER AND SINGLE FILE.


w . ws — . Y i, y S-., 44 – ~ ~ ~ ~ : ·i& . . . AFTER THE TAKING OP A GERMAN TRENCH: CROSSING-PLACES OVER THE DEEP TRENCH EXCAVATION MADE BY BRIDGES ” , 1 ~ . I I P ER T E TA I G P A GE M R OF M ATERIALS P ICK ED UP ON THE SPOT.I I


r — — —- ——– I I WITHIN SIGHT OP THE ENEMY AND UIDER FIRE : THE ONLY WAY IN WHICH IPNFANTRY THE OPEN CAN CEOSS A FIE-SWEPT ZONE °wrvoUr nISEING ANNHfLATION.


j – ;i CREEPIWG FORWARD TO GET WITHIN CHARGING DISTANCE INFANTRY IN THE FRNOT LINE OR HANDS AND KNEES4 TO OFFER TUE SMALLEST PGSSINLE TARGET.


From these illustrations one may gain a useful idea of how the task set the French and our own men in their fighting advance against the German entrenched line of positions as tto be carried out: practically by a steady, continuous move forward under fire all the time. Artillery preparation and smashing-through tactics serve on occasion, but the persistent push has to be kept up between whiles, storming a section of trenches here and there, and by degrees bending back the enemy line all along. The nature of these attacks and their working method we see here. The advance over the fire-swept zone, across whlch the enemy rain a hurricane of shot and shell and bullets, has to be made by the troops forming, so to speak, the spear-head


of the thrust, creeping forward on hands and knees so as to offer as small and inconspicuous a target as possible; company by company working forward in that manner, and battalion by battalion. Further back meanwhile, and less exposed to the enemy’s view and fire, the supports and reserve are following, in dlaces having to advance, as seen above, in single file, in order to minimise casualties. We get a glimpse, also, of one of the captured German trenches, with hasty bridging expedients, by means of fallen tree-trunks or planks found in debris on the spot, adopted by the victors to cross the deep trench excavation the more easily as they stream forward to attack the enemy’s supporting position beyond and make good the ground gained.



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