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Baghdad under British Rule: Cleaner Than for a Thousand Years

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41 – BOARDING A BOAT PROVIDED FOR THEM BY THE BRITISH AUTHORITIES : JEWS AND CHRISTIANS LEAVING BAGHDAD TO REJOIN RELATIVES AT BASRA.


“THE IN AIAT R HVN OE W O- TM HNTrY AV H D O 10 Y RS”. j H A MORE WHOLESOME TIME THAi ON BAGHDAD BRIDGA. tA N W NNA A R E


Recent news from Mesopotamia has chronicled another victory and a personal loss–the capture of Tekrit and the death of Sir Stanley Maude, the British Commander. Of the general state of our forces, and of Baghdad under British rule, a very cheerful account was given in an officer’s letter published in the “Morning Post” “We are all in high spirits,” he writes, “and confidently awaiting the rumoured effort of Fritz to pull Abdul out of the mems on this front. ….The show is so well organised now that we have


no supply troubles worth talking about, and the health conditions have improved to a truly wonderful extent. . .. The R.AJ..C. and the AS.C. together har organised supplies so that everybody gets a good ration of both fruit and vegetables, The in* habitants of the country bring in supplies, and aloe we are growing some supplies in the rest camps. . . . Baghdad was weirdly flthy when we entered it, and the civil population suffered heasviy from typhus. But we have cleaned the place up, and the [Csaes appMals.


WITH THE ANGLO-INDIAN FORCES IN BAGHDAD: A CLEANSED CITY. Orncui.A PHOTOOnrAPs


44 “BAGHDAD WAS WEIRDLY FILTHY… BUT WE HAVE CLEANED THE PLACE UP”: BRITISH UNIFORMS MINGLING WITH AN ORIENTAL CROWD AT THE KOTAH BRIDGE.


PART OF THE NDIAN FORCES IN ESOPOTAMIA, SOME OF WHICH SHARED IN THE CAPTURE OF TEKRIT : TROOPS ON THE MARCH THROUGH BAGHDAD.


inhabitants are having a more wholesome time than they have had for a thousand years or sa. As to whether they appreciate it or not I do not know. Some people do not like to be torn away from their smetls.” Indian troops shared in the recent British victory at Tekrit. “At 4.3o in the afternoon’; (of November 5), writes Mr. Edmund Candler, “Scottish troops and Indians attacked on the left. They rose in one line and advanced slowly aro 7o00 yards of fat at a walk, while our artillery put in a most


effective bombardment At 70 yards from the Turkish trnch they halted for the barrage, to lift, but the Turks, seeing the familiar tartan, did not wait for the bayonet The glimpse of them through the dust and smoke as they scrambled over the parados was too tempting for our infantry, who risked the last few seconds of the barrage.” Describing Tekrit, Mr. Candler says : “The townspeople, still waiting abott the streets, received our officers and sepoys of the regiment with good will.”



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