Home Archive Search Result Drawn at the Front by Frederic Villiers:"His Duty Done"

Drawn at the Front by Frederic Villiers:"His Duty Done"

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LEAVING HIS TRENCH FOR THE LAST TIME: A FRENCH SOLDIER TO WHOM WAR HAS GIVEN ETERNAL PEACE BORNE AWAY FROM THE FIRING-LINE.


Mr. Frederic Villers notes th this drawing shows an incident in the Fren front trench. The body of the soldier is borne on a stretcher made with two rifles. Most of the loop-holes have curtains to them ; these are drawn aside a fraction of an inch for observation and for firing. Light seen would show the enemy sniper the loop-hole. The men with the spades (on the right) have been clearing the water-course of the trench, thus doing


work which it is obvious has been very necessary, not only in the French trenches, but in the British, and, of course, in the German. It has been said, indeed, that none but those who have seen the mud in Slanders can realise fully the terrors of the mud of Poland, which led a nunber of Napoleon’s veterans to blow out their brains, or imagine what a powerful depressor mud can be.–[Draseg Copyrig~ d in th Usld Sttrs . Cawda.


DRAWN AT THE FRONT BY FREDERIC VILLIERS: GERMAN LINES SEEN THROUGH THE HYPOSCOPE AT FIFTEEN YARDS. DRAWN By FRItmEIc VlauRS, OUR Sc WARn AirrwrrD TO VIarsrI THE FROrr.


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w war-atists probably have ever drawn a enemy’s position at coseer range than did Mr. Frederic Virs when e made the aboe sketch from the Fmrech advance-treches ear Albert, at a point where the distace from the German advance-lines is only fifteen yards. Mr. Villiers was able to make hs unique drawing by courtesy of the French iry authorities, who have given him every faclity for isiting the front and shown himn al posaeie consideratlon. The drawing is lAo probably weigs as hating bern made through the hypoecope, for, naturally, at fifteen yrds’ range, an artist could not week while esposed to the esemys ite. The sted sies see round some of the looplmh i


L. Germa· trh-~a rp aw u ed by the Grmmns as protectio in censucting bareestwrks. One man rums orward with a sho d, fses it into the ground, and res from bhin it. anhe, other be d dig a trech, derwing up the sell behid the id, which is t-is left evesfntuly adhering to the outide of the parapet. The Germans cannot rousem it, of moum, without coi aer fre. Whoa ant being thus used, the shids are carried n the back by the German soldiers who are provided wit them.”-4Deed* Csppyedt ti of Uts Sia med cs,]


On Wednesday, March 0o. the Admiralty made two announcements. ie first ran: ” The German submarine ‘ U so’ was rammed to-day by ‘ Ariel’ (Lieut. – Commander James V. Creagh). The submarine sank and the crew surrendered.” The second was: “Later and more detailed reports have now been received which establish the fact that the German submarine which was rammed and sunk by H.M.S. ‘Ariel’ was ‘U I2’ and that out of her crew of 28, the number saved was ten.” It has been questioned whether the German submarine’s number, I2, was designed to mislead. According to published information, the “U iz ” should be of 3oo tons; but, as she was found to have a complement of zS, it is more probable that she displaced some 750 tons. This suggests two possibilities. Numbering to mislead we .have already mentioned. The other possibility, which is less probable, is that certain of the older enemy submarines are carrying double crews, that men for the under-water service


may be trained. It is interesting to note that the course of justice was interrupted momentarily in Mr. Justice Scrutton’s Court in the King’s Bench Divison while a message announcing the sinking was read I There was cheering in Court. The “U 1x,” which was completed in 1911, should be a vessel of 300 tons. (submerged), and 250 tons (on surface), and of the same class as the ” U 8 ” and ” U xS,” which have already been accounted for. Her speed under water would be 8 knots, and on the surface, 13 knots; with a radius of action of x2oo miles She should carry three x8-inch torpedo-tubes, and two I-pounder high-angle guns. The destroyer “Ariel,” launched by Messrs. Thornycroft in 1911, has a displacement of 780 tons. Her length is 252 feet; beam, 26.4 feet; and draught, 87 feet. She has a speed of over 2- knots, and is armed with two 4-inch and two x2-pounder guns, and two torpedo-tubes.-.L.oae c.pm5tM . it . us: susr ,o cs.d.l]



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