Home Archive Search Result Following up the German Retreat: The Cavalry at Last Get Their Long-Hoped-For Opportunity

Following up the German Retreat: The Cavalry at Last Get Their Long-Hoped-For Opportunity

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From time to time during the long months of trench warfare, it was suggested that cavalry were obsolete and no longer needed, anything they could do being better done by motor-cars or aeroplanes. Time has proved the fallacy of such ideas, for during the German retreat the British cavalry have done splendid work in scouting and skirmishing, and-have captured a number of villages on their own account. The Germans also used cavalry to screen their retreat, and skirmishes between the opposing cavalry screens were of daily occurrence. One such incident is here illustrated. A British cavalry patrol, feeling its way forward in the early morning, found and surprised a detachment of Uhlans at the end of a sunken road. The sentry was wounded and taken prisoner, while the rest of the Uhlans were put to flight, several being killed and wounded. About a mile further on a strong enemy party was located,


which was heavily shelled by the R.H.A. guns and broken up. Our cavalry, besides being proficient in the use of the “arine bianci.”‘ are trained to act as mounted infantry, as here, and are armed with the short rifle. At the beginning of the war they held the trenches with their ” foot-slogging ” comrades in arms, but have of late reverted to their proper rsle as horsemen, to the joy of all concerned. On the left in the drawing will be noticed a wounded Uhlan- possibly the sentry before-mentioned–standing in a sunken road beside his fallen horse. Further back, towards the centre, is a broken-down German transport-cart. In the right foreground are some dismounted British cavalrymen using their automatic rifles against the fleeing Uhlans. In the distance on the extreme right is smoke rising from burning buildings.-[Draosng Copyrighttd ns tie United States and Canada.] I.



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