Home Archive Search Result "Juggernauts" Germans Thought-An Impertinence: Tainks in Action: And Prisoners as Stretcher-Bearers

"Juggernauts" Germans Thought-An Impertinence: Tainks in Action: And Prisoners as Stretcher-Bearers

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LIKE A “BLIND CREATURE EMERGING FROM THE PRIMEVAL SLIME” A TANK IN ACTION ON THE BRITISH FRONT.


WITH ITS GUNS FIRING AS IT WENT INTO ACTION: A TANK PLOUGHING ITS WAY OVER THE SHELL-TORN BATTLEFIELD.


A SIGHT SAID TO HAVE FILLED THE GERMAN TROOPS WITH SUPERSTITIOUS TERROR: A TANK LOOMING OUT OF A CLOUD OF SMOKE.


MANNED BY MEN POSSESSED OF “THE VERY HIGHEST TYPE OF COURAGE”: A BRITISH TANK COMING INTO ACTION.


II i i: _ _ _.__ __________ _______ ___________”~Y·c~~;~’.~”‘.~ iii WITH A TANK IN THE DISTANCE HEAVING ITS MONSTROUS BULK ACROSS THE STRICKEN PILLD: A PL ARTY OF GERMAN PRISONERS UNDER GUARD HELPING TO CARRY A WOUNDED CANADIAN ON A STRETCHER. gj


In the greater part of our edition last week we gave a full-page photograph of one of the famous Tanks in action-pei on to illhtrateethe subject having jut t bee given by the authorities. Here we gve some further photographs Describing their first appearance in battle, Mr. Beach Thomas writes : “They looked like blind creatures emerging from the primeval slime. To watch one crawling round a battered wood in the half-light was to think of ‘the Jabberwock with eyes of flame’ who ‘Came whiffling through the tnlgey wood, And burbled as it came.’ . . One German office I met said it was ‘an impertinence’ to use them; and some of the German soldiers regarded them with some sort of superstitious terro for the first few minutes, till daylight disclosed their true nature. Even then they were alarming enough. With ludicrous arenity they wobbled acros the gridiron fit: – . . But while


all the Army talks with unceasing humour of the Tanks . . let no one be carried away by his humour into contempt of the animal or disregard of the crews. The very highest type of courage was possessed by the men who boxed themselves up and, embarked on this new thing, sailed straight into the hottest parts of the fight . . . They needed, as the ancients said, ‘ th triple brass of courage’ all the more for being encased in metal. At Courcelette, where battalion-commanders came out and gravely surrendered to the monster ; at Martinpuich. at High Wood, at Plers, the Tank those humorous Juggernauts, won points and saved good British lives.” Courcelette was captured by the Canadians. In the large photograph above is seen a wounded Caadian on a stretcher which some German prisoners are helping to carry ; while in the background on the left a Tank is sen heaving its monstrous bulk over the stricken field.



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