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Our Artillery in the Mud of Flanders: Man-Hauling a Field-Gun

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CROSSING A BATTLEFIELD IN POURING RAIN, THROUGH MUD NEARLY TO THE AXLE-TREES HEAVING A GUN FORWARD WITH DRAG-ROPES, WHILE THE TEAM-HORSES WAIT NEAR BY.

Immediately the day’s objectives have been won, and often while the infantry are stil at dose grips with the enemy b1yond the former German advanced lines, ome of the field artiler hatteses; after assisting in the barrage, are on the move to firing-stations yet nearer the enemy. They have to get there whatever may be the difficulties of the ground in present weather conditions. As correspondents’ letters have described, the entire surface on all Slanders battlefields has become since the October rains little more than a vast swampy morass or bo of mud, deep and soft, slippery, slimy, and cinging,

in which, i places, bhors sink to the belly and have practically to be levered up on to firmer patches. Everywhere, also, the mud is churned up by flling pojetile and pitted at every few yards with gaping sell-raters, full of water up to a man’s arm-pits many of them, some yet deeper. Across it all the batteries flounder, regardless of consequen, going forward by the shortest way to their new poest. Here we we a un so badly bogged that its homs and limber have had to leave it temprarily, to be hauled out with dra-repes.–.Lh e C.vyrl is sB UCed Sl a Ca.si.]


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Issue 4099. - Vol CLI

Nov, 10 1917

Illustrated London News