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"Past Pangani River": Picturesque Scenes of the British Operations in the Forests of German East Africa

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— –:·— – – – ” – – –T= -f- . . . + + I /…. A , .l, ‘ – CLW Sý , + O T P, W I E INTERROGATING A PRISON/ER : GENERAL HAN’NYNGTON’ AND HIS INTELLIGENCE OFFICER EXAMINING AN ENEMY PORTER, WITH IN’DIAN SEPOYS ON GUARD•


·I THE FIGHT FOR MOMBO: AN INDIAN MOUNTAIN BATTERY IN ACTION AT THE EDGE OF A RUBBER PLANTATION.


L~~~~ _____________ TRANSPORT DIFFICULTIES HAULING A BRIDGE GIRDER INTO PLACE ON A MILITARY “RAILWAY.


A BRIDGE OF COLLAPSIBLE BOATS OVER THE PANGANI RIVER, WITH A RAFT OF COLLAPSIBLE BOATS UNDER CONSTRUCTION.


A– ON THE ALLIGATOR-INFESTED PANGANI RIVER : AN OFFICER ON PATROL CROSSING BY A FALLEN TREE.


·.-I –. -9 4 1 S1 M} r , { t’ -· AFTER THE BATTLE OF THE SOKO: A GERMAN 4’I-INCH GUN BLOWN UP BY THE ENEMY.H {t


II 3 y TRANSPORT CROSSING A BAD DRIFT: MEN WAITING ON THE BANK TO HAUL THE WAGONS.


ik ‘S AT THE FIGHT FOR MOMBO ON THE TANGA-MOSHI RAILWAY : OFFICERS WATCHING THE OPERATIONS FROM THlE ROOF OF A NATIVE HOUSE.


MADE UP OF A MOTOR-CAR AND TROLLEYS : THE FIRST BRITISH TRAIN IN “GERMAN EAST.”


It will be recalled that the capital of German East Africa, Dar-es-Salaam, surrendered on September 4 to British naval forces co-operating with a land column. A few days later, General Botha stated in a speech that General Smuts was by that time in occupation of three-quarters of the German colony, including the whole of the railway, but that, although the end was in view, it was necessary to keep the forces there up to full strength. Later, General Smuts said in an official despatch : ” On September 15 our forces, which had fought their way since August 28 through and east and west of the central mountainous area, effected their junction near Kissaki, at the southern end of the hills, the remnants of the enemy’s troops having retired to the south-east. . . . The movements of our columns in and around the hills have been conducted in circumstances of great difficulty, involving the bridging of numerous streams and the blasting of roadways through the valleys. All this had to be undertaken whilst our main body was still dependent on a lengthy line of communication and supply leading back to the Usambara Railway and Tanga.” Some of the above photographs give an excellent idea of the methods whereby such difficulties were


overcome. Although taken during earlier operations, they lose no interest on that account, having, in fact, only just come to hand. General Hannyngton, who is seen in one photograph interrogating a captured native porter, was mentioned in a despatch published by the War Office on September L. ” The pursuit by our forces,” it stated, ” was hampered by supply and transport difficulties and by destruction of bridges. On August I6, a fresh enveloping movement was initiated, Brigadier-General Enslin, with mounted force, passing the Wami to the west, and Brigadier-General Sheppard’s Brigade passing the river wide to the west, while Brigadier-General Hannyngton’s Brigade attacked in the centre.” In the photograph showing the bridge of collapsible boats over this river, the palm leaves along the bridge are screens to prevent animals from shying at the water. A raft of collapsible boats is also seen under construction in the background. The train, composed of a motor-car and trolleys, seen at Moshi Station, ran between that place and Kahe until the Military Railway from Voi was connected, thus allowing regular rolling stock to be brought up.



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