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MAKING MOVING PICTURES BENEATH THE SEA


BY PRANK HOLMES.


PROF. J. S. MACDONALD. Prof Jo . S. Macdon. has recety succeeded Profesor Sherr.gton : the Chair of Phyology at the University of Lerpool, where he was fomerly an A tant Lecturr. Since sOo3 he has been Prolesnor of Phyoloy in the Unlnverty of Sheffeld. He has aso taught in the Physnlogcal Laboratory ,t Dundee. -I j’hntonrapk by isddr* Id D in


X 7It) Iim his boIyhoil days has not revelled in the thrills and fascinations of that wonderful ,torv by Jules Verne, ” Twenty Thousand Leagues ndler the Sea.” and followed with blreathless Interest the tdoinigs of the mysterious Captain Nemo urit lhl, marvellous sulbmarinel craft, the Nautilus ? \%h luds not delighted rm the gifted ,.uthor’s imagin- itt vi vet vivil descriptions of existence beneath


FILMING ” THE WATER-WORLD FOR THE FIRST TIME : A DIAGRAM SHOWING THE FLEXIBLE TUBE LOWERED FROM THE OPERATING. CRAFT ” JULES VERNE” AND THE CINEMATOGRAPHER AT WORK BELOW. By courtesy of the S” Scifif Ameonoa ” awe re able to reproduce three most intermtin dlustrattons of the takum of the trst movmg pturmes ev obtained nder water. The ,lhotonraphs accompanied an articl m that paper by Mr. J. E. Wiliamsono, whbose fther, Mr. Charles Wiliamao. invented the flexbIe tube through which the photographer descends ,nto the depths from the special operati-craft ” Jule Ve-ne” The tube is of ie0bleo metWlh constructtoo, and m it an operator can wk for boors under normal atmospheric cood.tono. The first films ere taken in the Bahama, the operator beng Mr. Carl L. Gregory. On other pages we illustrate some of the wonderful results of the eopedition. ‘hotoraP ropyrlgi by J. E. Wtliamson. By Couofaey of the ” ScikentfiJc Amr-rn .”


the waves, of the teeming life and terrible monsters inhabiting the hidden depths, and all the million marvels of an unknown world ? And now, to-day, there lies in the harbour of Nassau, the capital of the Bahamas, that small British colony so little known to Englishmen lying off the coast of Florida, LA mysterious craft named the Jules Verne, and her tender, the Nautilus, whose mission is not, indeed, to plunge herself beneath the waves on which her ,omewhat ungainly shape floats so buoyantly, but o contain a perfect network of curious machinery, it submersible tubes and submarine chambers, of strange winches, travelling-chains and running and lhomsting-apparatus–all designed with the most bril- mant success to enable the photographer to descend slth his motion-picture camera into the blue depths


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of the ocean and there to photograph for tho tirst time in the history of the world, in perfect security, in comfort and at leisure, the busy life of the teeming denizens of the sea ! In our issue of July z6, 1913, we published, through the courtesy of our contemporary, the Scientific American. pictures of the interesting in- vention of Mr. (harles Williamson (who was born In Annan, Scotland) for carrying on various opera- tions under water. Mr. Williamson is now the President of the Williamson Submarine Corporation.


His two sons, Messrs. J. E. Williamson and G. M. Williamson, the General Manager and Secretary respectively of the Submarine Film Company, with Mr. Carl Louis Gregory, chief ouerator of the Tanhouser Film Corooration.


have been in Nassau now for some weeks busily engaged in taking what may be properly de- scribed as an absolutely unique series of photographs of sub- marine life for the Mutual Film Service, which will be shown at practically every motion-picture theatre in the world. The first step was to have the Jules Verne built and fitted with the necessary machinery and apparatus, including the sub- mersible terminal operating- chamber, in which the work is carried on at the bottom of the sea, and the collapsible, flexible metallic tube connecting the vessel and the terminal operat-


ing-chamber. This was all successfully done by a local ship-builder, the plans of the inventor (who spent thirty years on perfecting his submersible tube) proing absolutely perfect in practice; and clay after day the Williamson Brothers, with their accomplished photographer, Mr. Gregory, are now steadily accumulating a quantity of motion – pictures of sub- marine life. Nassau was chosen as the scene of operations on account of the justly famed clarity and beauty of its surrounding shoal waters and coral reefs of striking formation. Although but little known in England, it is a popular winter resort of Americans, possesses plenty of first-class hotel accommodation, and is visited every winter by an increasing number of Ameri-


can and Cana- dian tourists, who luxuriate in its unrivalled climate and en- joy themselves amidst its many attractions. Of its beautiful sub – tropical waters has been written : ” The change from the undulating in-


digo of the majestic ocean to the lesser depths becomes very perceptible, and the water, transparent, pellucid, and clear as crystal, sparkles in the sun like myriads of jewels, reflecting a thousand shades of marvellously beau- tiful colouring, from a glittering emerald through a deep purple to the purest ultramarine.” At one end of its harbour are situated the Sea Gardens, and so clear are the waters that, looking through the glass aperture


DR SERGE VORONOFP. Dr. Vorooff, an eminent Russian surgeon, recmty performed Sremarkabl opetion on an idiot boy ner Nice, grafting on the brain part of the thyroid gland of a haboon. This groetly unproved the boy’s mental cooditioo and pysaial growth. Dr. Vorooff aterwards described the operation befo the Paris Academy.–Photograop by Record Press.]


of the submarine chamber of the Jules Verne, the fortunate onlooker can see in front of him for a distance of 15o feet, and gazes, amazed, on a wondrous submarine garden of surpassing loveli- ness, variously inhabited by growing corals, sponges, purple ” sea-fans ” and waving yellow ” sea-


“THE ODD-SHAPED OPERATING CRAFT “: THE “JULES VERNE ” AT ANCHOR IN THE HARBOUR OF NASSAU, IN THE BAHAMAS Phorpah by Fr-nk Hatlme.


feathers,” among which swim fishes of every size and variety. At the invitation of thy: Williamson Brothers, his Excellency the Governor of the Bahamas, Mr. George B. Haddon-Smith, C.M.G., and a small party which included Mrs. Haddon-Smith, last month visited the Jules Verne while at anchor over the Sea Gardens in Nassau, and were safely initiated into the fascinating mysteries of submarine photography. One curious feature of a submarine view looked at from the chamber of the Jules Verne is that tne sense of looking through water is quite lost to the spectator, who remembers with difficulty that he is not looking at a veritable garden, or a distant landscape with its trees waving in the breeze I For one does not see the water, which is almost as clear as the air, only, of course, much denser, but sees through it, and another queer result of this is that the fishes swimming among the vegetation look for all the world like air-ships !


TAKING THE FIRST SUBMARINE CINEMATOGRAPH FILMS: A DIAGRAM SHOWING AN OPERATOR AT WORK AT THE BOTTOM OF THE FLEXIBLE TUBE LOWERED FROM THE ‘ JULES VERNE.” Phot*oepA copyrstM by J. J. Wtie…. Bv Coaurte o/ e ” Scnte Amrrn “”



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Issue 3927. - Vol CXLV

Jul, 25 1914

Illustrated London News