The Last Unicorn (Deluxe Edition) Archive Search Result Syrian and Armenian Refugees near Baghdad: In British Care

Syrian and Armenian Refugees near Baghdad: In British Care

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A TOWN OF TENTS FOR 50,000 REFUGEES : BA’QUBAH CAMP, NEAR BAGHDAD, ORGANISED BY THE BRITISH.


REFUGEES IN CAMP : A VIEW OF ONE OF THEIR SHELTERS; WITH A SMALL BOY SALUTING.


BRITISH ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE FEEDING OF 50,000 EXILED PEOPLE : REFUGEES DRAWING THEIR RATIONS.


“HOSPITALS HAVE BEEN ESTABLISHED “: REFUGEE PATIENTS AND VISITORS AT A HOSPITAL COOK- HOUSE.


“REFUGEES FIT TO WORK ARE EMPLOYED ON ROAD – CONSTRUCTION ” : WATCHING A MOTOR- TRACTOR PASSING.


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USEFULLY EMPLOYED: SOME OF THE 900 REFUGEE ORPHANS FOR WHOM AN ORPHANAGE HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED.


I _ LIKE FIGURES IN THE LAYARD SCULPTURES : MEMBERS OF THE SHAMSDIM CLAN (NESTORIAN CHRISTIANS).


ESCAPED FROM THE TURKS AFTER FIGHTING FOR THE ALLIES : REFUGEES IN CAMP-A TYPICAL BAZAAR SCENE.


After the Russian retreat from Trans-Caucasia, most of the Christian inhabitant of the region between Mosul, Lake Van, and Urmia, who had fought gallantly on the side of the Allies, were left to struggle alone agalone ainst the Turks and Kurds. Faced with great odds, they tried to escape through Persia, but the Persians drove them back. Eventually a British air officer from Mesopotamia flew to Urmia and arranged for a convoy to bring them to our lines at Hamadan, in Persia. Thousands perished, and the survivors, some 50,000, reached British protection in a deplorable condition. They were transferred to a


special amp at Ha’qubah, 33 miles north-east of Baghdad, and there everything possible has been done for their welfare by the British authorities. They are fed and clothed ; hospitals, schools, and an orphanage have been established, as well as churches, a market, and a railway station. Armenians and East Syrians are kept separate, as their language and form of faith difler. The central photograph above shows a group of Van Armenians. An article giving the full story of the refugees will be found on another page. The writer compares their picturesque dress to figures in the Layard sculptures.



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Issue 4181. - Vol CLIV

Jun, 07 1919

Illustrated London News