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The Assassination of the Amir of Afghanistan: Incidents in the Career of Habibullah Khan

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* .1 – – – – – . 1. – ~-. — — —- – – — – – – – ··—- THE LATE AMIR AS A FILM OPERATOR: INSTRUCTING HIS SUBJECTS BY CINEMATOGRAPH IN HIS PALACE.


THE LATE AMIR AS A DEVOTEE OF SPORT: ON A HAWKING EXPEDITION IN THE HILLS ROUN. KABUL.


The Press Bureau announced on February 24 : “News has been received from Kabul of the death of the Amir of Afghanistan. Full details are still lacking, but it appears that the Arnr was attacked very early in the morning while in camp in Laghman on February ao and shot dead. No arrests have yet been reported in connection with the murder, the motives of which are at present obscure.” The Amir Habibullah, whose name means ” Beloved of God,” had always preserved friendly relations with the British Government in India, pe since his visit to that country in 1907 and durin the war his staunch loyalty, and his success in maintaining a strict neutrality and keeping order on the fron’ier, was of great value to the Allied cause. He was the son of the orevlous Amir. Abdur Rahman, chosen by the British as ruler of Afghanistan towards the end of the Afghan War in 1878. and was born in Samarkand in 2872. He


4-, THE AMIR’S RELIGIOUS DEVOTION: AT PRAYER WITH HIS BODYGUARD AT THE JUMMA MUSJID, PESHAWUR.


x+ _ TH AI HABIBULLAH AS A CRICKETER : HIS LATE MAJESTY BATTING IN A GAME WITH AFGHAN PRINCES NEAR HIS PALACE AT KABUL. -_ . . . . …. b ! r L, f i—–”-‘–·–Z~zs== —–M’ M-


succeeded to the throne on his father’s death in 19o1. He was far ahead of most of his subjects in intellectual attainments and breadth of outlook. During his visit to India he was on excellent terms with the Viceroy, Lord Minto, and with Lord Kitchener, whom he admired intensely. He was greatly interested in mcchanical inventions, including motor-cars and the cine- matograph, which he used personally for educational purposes in his palace, and he introduced electric light at Kabul. He was a man of great versatility, a good linguist, singer, dancer, and bridge-player, an expert cook, a fine shot, and keenly interested in sport and games such as cricket and tennis. He ruled his turbulent people firmly and despotically, for he considered they were not ripe for more democratic forms of government. He was a devout Mussulman, and strictly abstcmious.-[Drawings Copyighted in the United States ad Canada.j


4 1 . : ~’ii flf ? ‘ I ‘ ~ ~ ~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -4_-· . . .. . . “‘ __-··I ·—– – ,~ . . IN THE ART SCHOOL WHICH HE FOUNDED AT KABUL: INSPECTING A PORTRAIT OF HIMSELF BY AN AFGHAN.


i i Ii i j i i I: KEEPING IN TOUCH WITH WESTERN AFFAIRS: THE LATE AMIR READING “THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS.” !



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Issue 4167. - Vol CLIV

Mar, 01 1919

Illustrated London News