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The Best-Loved of British Soldiers: Lord Roberts of Kandahar

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IN THE EARl I!R DAYS OF HIS SOLDIERING L:ORD ROBERTS,


HOW LORD ROBERTS WON THE V.C.: RECOVERING A STANDARD FROM TWO SEPIOYS AT KHUDAGANJ ON JANUARY 2, 1858, DURING THE INDIAN MUTINY. ” ; .. .. . … . . . . ? , . . . . . ,;.. .. .


A NARROW ESCAPE. RCBERTS KNOCKED OVER WHILE IN CHARGE OF A GUN BEFORE DELHL


Lord Roberts was born at Cawnpore on September 30, 1832. His father, afterwards General Sir Abraham Roberts, was then in command of the Bengal European Regiment. now the Munster Fusilhers. He came of an old Irish family in County Waterford. After being educated in England, Frederick Roberts returned to India in 1852, and served as A.D.C. to his father at Peshawar. In 1854 he joined the Bengal Horse Artillery. He fought through the Indian Mutiny, taking part in the siege of Delhi and the relief and defence of Lucknow, was wounded, and had several narrow escapes. He won the V.C. by saving the life of a sowar who was overmatched by two sepoys, and recovering a


LORD ROBERTS’ FATHER: GENERAL SIR ABRAHAM ROBERTS, G.C.B.


I – —-1 i Ft ROBERTS IN AFGHANISTAN: READING THE PRO- CLAMATION AT KABUL ON OCTOBER ,879.


LORD ROBERTS’ MOTHER: LADY ROBERTS. ” FORMERLY MISS ISABELLA BUNBURY,


IN THE DAYS OF MUTTON-CHOP” WHISKERS: LORD ROBERTS IN r88a


-i * THE CLIMAX OF HIS LAST GREAT CAMPAIGN : RECEIVING THE SURRENDER OF CRONJE AT PAARDEBURG IN x9oo ON THE ANNIVERSARY OF MAJUBA DAY. 1–. –··~ ·~——~~~~


SANOTHER NARROW ESCAPE IN THE MUTINY: A TROOPER OF THE grT LANCERS SAVES ROBERTS.


standard from two other sepoys. In 1878 he took command of the Punjab Frontier Force, and later came the famous marches to Kabul and Kandahar. In 1885 he became Commander-in-Chief in India, which he finally left in 1893. The story of his career there is told in his ” Forty-One Years in India.” How, in 1899, he went out to take command in South Africa, and turned ill-success into victory, is within the memory of most. It was on February 27 (Majuba Day), I9oo, that Cronje surrendered at Paardeburg with 400ooo men. Lord Roberts returned to England in 1901, and succeeded Lord Wolseley as Commander-in-Chief. He was created an Earl in 190z.



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