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The British Entry into Baghdad: The First Official Photograph: And Scenes of the Advance on the City

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CAPTURED BY THE TURKS AND RECAPTURED IN THE ADVANCE ON BAGHDAD : AN 18-POUNDER BRITISH FIELD-GUN.


1; SPOILS OF THE ADVANCE ON BAGHDAD : CAPTURED TURISH MACIIUE-GUNS, 1 AND THE RECAPTURE~D FIELD-GUN.


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MADE TO COMMEMORATE THE FALL OP KUT AND FDIISHND JUST IN TIME FOR THE BITIISH ENTRY DIrO BAGHDAD: KHALA. ~tPA 13?, 3ASUDAD; I SHOWING A BRITISH ARMY LORRY.


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f0 the remarkably interesting phegaps gaie eon these two paCea, the frw sma es were· tbe final opramtise befre Bogh d, and the two htrgr ses ht the th of the British entry. The British x-pounder field-gun shown in the first two pbtgraphs was caured b the Ibrks at Ahwa in z aw-~l aaptqmd in the advaone an Baghda this year. Describing the last stages of the epartios that le t to the fal of the city, Mr. Edmund Candler mentis tha the Dil, a tributary of the Tigris below Bh , w hld by the Turks “with nu oero macbine-g ,” ad continues: “On the night ot March 9-1o and the day of the zth, ear left-beak troo p cosplete the p~e of the Dils, apimdl the riverside villages in mceseima, and d oze the smny freom his last trench-in. On the aight ed the zoth-zzth, the Ttrkibh fSoaes beat a siitpm set eat oa both Lb pstream of Baghdad, and early n the morning of the usth, we occupied the city.” In lat der eptheb, Mr. Candler quots an iaeresti accat by a Britis Stu aCar tof the entry into the city and subsequent .sces. “No thin,” be ers, ” puld have been more casual than our entry in Bgdad. . . . We had beens biLse king out s a bewig dst We


e dirty, owashed, unsaven, ued. My e, who a ew days before had broken tether and dispo sed herself of the best pt of her bridle, had on makeshift headstall of rope. On the.whole, we did not make up a very i rpeo g crtie for a historic State entry. Soon we were cantring along Khalil Pasha Street. The road was thronged with a jubilant crowd. The roofs and balconies were packed with wome in bright dresses. Children danced In front of us, uttering hril Arab cries and clapping their hands. Khalil Pasha Street, through which .we rode, the only broad thoroughfare in the city, received the name of the local Hindenburg in commemoration of the fall of Kut. By a stroke of irony, the road that was built to mmrie our reverse at ut was completed just in time to aord s a passage through Baghdad.. . . The greater part of the Expeditionary Force is still engaged in hunting down the Turk, east, wet, and north, and the Sta, besides carryng on the was, have the whole civil and maltary administration of the city thrown on their shoulders.” The large photograph on the left, taken in Khali Pasha Street, shows some bues deamolished by the Turks in order to make the road.



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