Home Archive Search Result The Campaign in the Gallipoli Peninsula: Photographs That Illustrate Sir Ian Hamilton's Great Despatch

The Campaign in the Gallipoli Peninsula: Photographs That Illustrate Sir Ian Hamilton's Great Despatch

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I* A EVIDE.CE OF THE PRICE THAT TURKEY IS PAYING FOR GERMANYS FRIENDSHIP 11 STURKLISH CEMETERY IN GULLY RAVINE. CAPTURED RECENTLY. f


iT -V I SHOWING SIGNS OF ASTY FLIGHT: AN ABANDONED TURISH TRENCH, WITH EQUIMENT L BEHIND.


isV A DISTANT VIEW OF ONE OF THE n ATURA STRONGHOLDS OF GALLIPOLI: ACHI BABA-SEEw IBETWEEN TWO TREES


WHERE THE TRENCHES ARE CLOSE AND FRINGE A PRECIPICE: A PERISCOPE-RIFLE AT QUINN’S POST.


LWHERE A GALLANT AUSTRALIAN OFFICER LIES BURIED: THE GRAVE OF MAJOR 1 QUINN (IM FOREGROUND) WHOSE HEROISM GAVE THE NAME TO “OUIN’S POST ”


___I ý r / ii TROOPS FROM INDIA WHO HAVE FOUGHT BRAVELY AT THE DARDANELLES: GURKHAS IN THEIR FIRE-TRENCHES.


iti I I Sli ] THE SCENE OF A BRILLIAET EEPLOIT :VTHE GURKIAS AND NAMED AFTER ITS CAPTORS _ _ L


INAMED AFTER COLONEL BRUCE (SEEN FOURTH FROM LEFT, LIGHTING HIS PIPE, OUTSIDE THE GURKHA OFFICERS’ MESS): “BRUCE’S RAVINEL.”


ANOTHER GLIMPSE OF THE GURKHA FIRING-LINE. SOME OF THE HARDY HILLMEN IN THEIR TRENCHES.


NEAR THE FRENCH CAMP IN GALPOLI: A PICTURESQUE CLUMP OF TREES 1L~r–


m )UR “NAKED” ARMY IN GALLPOLI: A SOLDIER MT ONLY HIS IDENTITY-DISC ON HIS BACLK.


A VIEW FROM THE HEADQUARTERS CAMP OF THE RI.D.) A CHARACTERISTIC LAJDSCAPE II THIE GALLUOU PEINRULA.


ON SENTRY-GO IN SOUTHERN GALLIPOL: A SCENE LIKE AN ENGLISH LANE.


TRANSPORT DIFFICULTIES: A TYPICAL STOMY ROAD OVER WHICH GUNS HAVE TO BE DRAWN.


In the light of the vivid despatch from Sir Ian Hamilton whch was published recently, as well as later indications of events at the Dardanelles, these photographs illustratlng the campaign there are just now of particular interest. Especially so is that taken at Quinn’s Post, a much-contested point in the “Ansac ” postion frequently mentioned in the despatch, and that showing the grave of Lajor Quinn, the gallant Australian officer who gave his name to it ” Around Quinn’s Post,” writes Sir Ian Hamilton, ” both above and below ground, the contest has been particularly severe. This section of the line is situated on the circumference of the ‘ Anzac ‘ semi-circle at the furthest point from its d neter. Here our fire-tenches are mere ledges on the brink of a sheer precipice falling oo feet into the valley below. The enemy’s trenches are only few feet distant. .. On May 9, a mine was sprung in or near the centre of Quinn’. Post. The explosion was followed by a very heavy bomb-attack . . . letting in a storming party of Turks. . . At 5-30 a.m. our


counter-attack was launched, and by 6 a.m. the position had been retaken with the bayonet by the r5th Australian Infantry Battalion , led by Major Quinn, who was, unfortunately, killed.” Much subsequent fighting has taken place there. The history of Gurkha Bluff and the exploit that gave it that name is also told by Sir Ian Hamilton. Covered by artillery-fire and the guns of two cruisers, H.M.S. “Dublin” and “Talbot,” on the evening of May sa “a double company of the t-6th Gurkhas once more crept along the shore and assembled below the bluff. Then, the attention of the Turks being taken up with the bombardment, they swiftly scaled the cliffs and carried the work with a rush. The machine-gun section of the Gurkhas was hurried forward, and at 4.30 a.m. a second double company was pushed up to join the first.” Two other double companies afterwards moved up in support, and completed “the escalade of Gurkha Bluff.”



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Issue 3989. - Vol CXLVII

Oct, 02 1915

Illustrated London News