Home Archive Search Result The German Offensive: Flaming Pozières, "One of the Most Awe-Inspire-Inspiring Sights of the War"

The German Offensive: Flaming Pozières, "One of the Most Awe-Inspire-Inspiring Sights of the War"

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FIRED BY THE BRITISH ON RETIREMENT TO STRONGER POSITIONS: THE BURNING OF POZIERES, ON THE ALBERT-BAPAUME ROAD – A LURID SCENE OF FLAMES AND EXPLOSIONS.

Positres is- or was- a village about four miles north-east of Albert on the high road to Bapaume, near Courcelette, Martinpuich, Basentin, and Contaaion. Our drawing illustrates the scene during the German advance from Bapaumne towards Albert. On the left is the road with a burning tank in the background In the centre background an ammunition-dump and stores are blazing, the ammunition bursting in all directions; and among the buildings may be noted a large square water-tank. On the right is a railway siding. In the foreground is a British patrol-R.F.A. officers and infantrymen. On the retirement from Pozibres the place was set on ire, and quickly became one of the most awe-inspiring sights of the whole war. Great gusts of flame and smoke rose up from the burning stores, lighting the whole

country for many miles round, while huge exptosions took place at intervals from the ammunition. Blazing cordite cartridges of the guns flashed in all directions. Describing the fighting in this district, Mr. Percival Phillips writes : “The stand of our troops everywhere has been splendid beyond description. . . . The battlefield several mile east of Albert awakened as though from the dead. . . . Six days ago you could motor from Amiens to Bapaume in fifty minutes, slipping from Albert along the last stretch of glistening roadpst the rubbish heap at the windmill by Pozibres, and the loneliness of the journey would remain a poignant memory. To-day the fissures in the brown earth on the astern edge of the waste are again full of Germans.”–raster copg iyis is si St·a swea caa .]


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Issue 4126. - Vol CLII

May, 18 1918

Illustrated London News