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The Great Battle of the Marne: Phases of the Fighting Which Caused the German Retreat

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i S”JL j DESTROYED BY THE FRENCH: THE REMAINS OF A STONE BRIDGE OVER THE MARNE.


–· – — —~~~-II 1 11 lrý ii ° ,I ‘EN AVANT!”–WHAT THE FRENCH LIKE BESI INFANTRY GOING FORWARD TO THE ATTACK. ….._ ~ .__.__._…


1 I DETROED BY TE FREN E RMN FA OII D DESTROYED BY THE FRENCH: THE REMAINS OF AN IRON BRIDGE OVER THE MARNE. 1


-r . S A RELICOF THE GREAT RETREAT: AN ABANDONED FRENCH SHELTER -TRENCH BY THE ROAD NEAR CAMBRAL A~~~~ ~ RELC F TE RET C:BAI


Yf , ýý 4! ‘k If dl ON HE ERMNS’HEELS :FRENCH ARTILLERY PASSING THROUGH A VILLAGE NEAR MEAUX. iY : 0


ii RUNNING TO TH-E AID) O1F AN ENEMY: TWO BRAVE FRENCH PRIESTS ON THE BTLFEDNEAR MEAUX. -1 ý r ý r’ , “1 ‘ 1 V ! r t ” … a ‘ . r` , itaX 4v. ° ‘ ‘I,. j ý I .d “S ,.ý f i ;fý .?. “, ; f F ., n .


tL~x EVER READY TO MEET THE GERMANS: TURCOS ON THE MARCH TO BATTLE. IEV RA TO___ MEE _


I–·F·-~-== ——-·’ Sv GRA C – ATTA NA AU FRENCH INFANTRY UNDER FIRE: HOLDING BACK =A GERMAN COUNTER-ATTACK NEAR EAUX.


II AA f l i’i -ý I .. . G- ibi G MI.TICISIT~hEŽ; EY AI GEMNSPOILS FROM *HE MAN BATTLEFIELDS. CRITICISINGTH r GERAN*li*


The Battle of the Marne, which has stopped the German advance on Paris and forced the invaders to fall back in disorder, leaving guns and prisoners in the hands of the Allies, began on September 7. Deluding themselves with the idea that the British troops on the left of the French main army had been “driven out of the fight,” the German right wing corps on September 6 daringly attempted to cut the Allied army in two between the British and the nearest French corps. The Germans, however, were checked by the French Fifth Army (that next to the British), and simultaneously Sir John French, with opportunely received reinforcements, vigorously took the offensive. The Germans, caught with their venturesome move uncompleted, had to retreat, for the first time in the war, and to their surprise and disappointment, as letters found on dead officers show. Their rear-guards were pressed back to the Marne on the 8th by the British and French troops conjointly, and on the 9th the British crossed the Marne. Hurriedly retreating, the Germans were hotly pursued,


the French on their side doing their part with brilliant dash on that day and the next, during which guns and machine-guns, prisoners, and transport wagons were taken. It may be added that in an official Press Bureau report, issued on September 14, it is said that during the pursuit of the Germans, ” many of the enemy were killed and wounded, and the numerous thick woods which dot the country north of the Marne are filled with German stragglers. Most of them appear to have been without food for at least two days. Indeed, in this area of operations the Germans seem to be demoralised and inclined to surrender in small parties.’ . .. Much brutal and senseless damage has been done in the villages occupied by the enemy. Property has been wantonly destroyed, pictures in the chateaux have been ripped up, and the houses generally pillaged. It is stated on unimpeachable authority also that the inhabitants have been much ill-treated.” The two bridges shown in the top left-hand and top right-hand photographs were at Lagny.



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Issue 3935. - Vol CXLV

Sep, 19 1914

Illustrated London News