Home Archive Search Result The Great War: Reflections of the "World-Fight"—At and near the Front; in Canada; and at Home

The Great War: Reflections of the "World-Fight"—At and near the Front; in Canada; and at Home

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IERMAN MILITARY GOVERNOR IN BELGIUM FNER a4L VON DER GOLTZ.


SMILING, THOUGH WOUNDED: A HIGHLANDEF CARRIED BY AN SE AND C.R PORTER.


IN ThE TONN NEAR WHICH GUR MFN FOUGHT: A CHURCH IN MONS. t, .1


SHORT SHRIFT FOR SPIES IN CANADA: REMOVING THE BODY OF A SUSPECT SHOT BY A SENTRY AT MONTREAL


SMILING, THOUGH WOUNDED A SERGEANT OF A BRITISH CAVALRY REGIMENT CARRIED PICK-A-BACK.


, i I! I Wu – L – . ~ – – – – ~ – — – __ _ _ _ _ _ – -*Ir “SOLDIER AID SAILOR TOO”: BRITISH ROYAL MARINE HRULSD BY THE PEOPLE OF OSTEND AS THEY MARCHED STHROUGH THE TOWN. DI ” . —– :l··li-ll-·”ll-rlllll··r – III I 1′ [ IIII i ZII Ca ‘ –


r i* AMERICAN VOLUNTEERS TO FIGHT FOR FRANCE THE THEIR WA ARE AND STRIPES BORNE THROUGH PARIS BY MEN ON SENLIST.


JS CASE: A MOTOR-CAR CONTAINING SWOUNDED SOLDIER ON THE QUAY AT BOULOGNE -I F . . . …. . . . ..


WITH HE BRITISH AIR-SHIP “ASTRA TORRES” HOVERING OVER THE TOWN: OSTEND SANDS AND BATHING CABINS AS A CAMP FOR REFUGEES, AND CHILDREN DIGGING CASTLES. I


GERMAN PRISONERS IN THE HARDY COUNTRY: ON THE WAY UNDER ARMED ESCORT TO THE CONCENTRATION CAMP AT DORCHESTER


k 9 HELPING A WOUNDED MAN ALONG : BRITISH SOLDIERS AT HAVRE. i . . . .. .. ..


THE BRITISH COMMANDER AGAINST TOGOLAND TEMPORARY LIEUT.-COLONEL F. C BRYANT.


DISABLED BY GERMAN BULLETS: A WOUNDED BRITISH OFFICER AT FOLKESTONE.


I . _ _ S THE PRINCIPAL PUBLIC BUILDING Ir IN uONS THE HOTEL DE VILLE.


There has been considerable comment in the Press regarding the leniency shown by the authorities to German spies in this coantry, as compared with the treatment they receive elsewhere. In the Colonies even, spies are dealt with more summarily, to judge by the scene shown in our second photograph. At the military headquarters in Montreal a German insulted the guard at the Drill Hall, and when he was about to be arrested drew a revolver, where pon he was immediately shot dead by the sentry. In the photograph some members of the Army Medical Corps are seen removing the body.–With regard to photograph No. 5, it may be mentioned that Captain F. C. Bryant was the senior British officer at the Gold Coast Station at the beginning of the war, and it fell to him to conduct the operations against German Togoland, taking the rank of Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel. He crossed the


border on August 7 with a small detachment of the Gold Coast Regiment, in motor-cars, and entered Lome, from which the Germans had retired on Kamina, some too mles inland, where was their wireless-telegraph station. At Lome the British were joined by a small French force from Dahomey, and the allies advanced together. After some fighting, in which Lieutenant G. M. Thompson was killed, the Germans surrendered unconditionally.–The first battle of the British army in France against the Germans was fought near Mons. The first British wounded were brought home to this country by the Boulogne boat to Folkestone on August 27. Others have arrived since. On the 27th a strong force of British Marines was landed t Ostend, and they were received with enthusiasm by the inhabitants.



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Issue 3933. - Vol CXLV

Sep, 05 1914

Illustrated London News