Home Archive Search Result The Hougomont of the Battle of the Marne: The Great Struggle for the Château of Mondement

The Hougomont of the Battle of the Marne: The Great Struggle for the Château of Mondement

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As mentioned under the other drawing of the same subject elsewhere in this number, the beautiful old Chateau of Mondement, about four miles east of Sezanne, was the scene of some of the fiercest fighting in the Battle of the Marne. The French troops occupied it first, but were driven out by the Germans after a terrific assault in which the enemy lost very heavily. Soon, however, the French brought up some of their ’75 guns, and their infantry rushed the breaches made in the walls, and entered the chateau by the windows. Once more the Germans returned to the attack, and succeeded in temporarily dislodging the French. Believing that the latter had been finally driven from the half-demolished chateau, the Germans proceeded to make themselves as comfortable as they could amid the ruins, and their officers sat down to a dinner.

The revellers, however, were rudely disturbed just as they were beginning by another French assault, and beat a hasty retreat, leaving their meal uneaten. The French again carried the chateau by storm, and on this occasion-the fourth time it had changed hands-succeeded in permanently holding it. The regiments engaged were the 32nd of the French lne and the 23rt Territorials. They were opposed by the redoubtable Prussian Guards. The struggle for the chateau of Mondement recalls in some respects that for Hougomont at Waterloo. On his sketch Mr. Frederic Villiers notes : “The final assault by the French on the Chateau of Mondement. The flank attack through breaches in the wall. After capturing the place and losing it foul times during the last day of the great battle, the French finally turned the enemy out, and the Germans commenced their retreat towards the south-east.”


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