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The Japanese Ethronment:"Coronation" Day in Kyoto

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I I1I w … . .. _ .. – — . .__.._ _… .. . . . . . . . THE EMPEROR OF JAPAN RETURNING FROM HIS ENTHRONEMENT: THE IMPERIAL CARRIAGE, WITH A MOUNTED ESCORT, LEAVING THE SCENE OF THE CEREMONY. j


NOT PERMITTED TO LOOK DOWN UPON THEIR EMPEROR FROM ROOFS I I i AIM


JAPAN’S RISING GENERATION ON “CORONATION” DAY: HAPPY CHILDREN WAVING BANNERS.


CI’ A PICTURESQUE ELEMENT IN J.PANESE LIFE: A PROCESSION OF GEISHA ON “CORONATION” DAY


As explained under our illustrations of Japanese Coronation ceremonies in our Issue of the ith. the “ord ” coronation ” is not strictly correct, as no crowning of the Emperor takes place, anm no crown is used. The Japanese name of the occasion does not seem to have received an exact English equivalent, but the word ” enthronement ” has been suggested as more nearly applicable. What happens on the great day is that after the expiration of the pe;io~ of mourning for the late Emperor (in this case extended by that for the late Empres.. Dowager) the new Emperor announces his assumption of the Imperial authority to i : spirits of his ancestors, the Japanese people, and the world


in general. The Emperor Yoshihito performed this ceremeny on Noventer to at Kyoto, the ancient capital of Japan. In .he morning he recited his Imperial report to his ancestors in the sanctuary ; in the afternoon he read the Imperial Rescript addressed to the nation and the foreign representatives. At the end the Prime Minister, Count Okuma, replied, concluding by giving three ” banzais “-the signal for the whole country to burst into acclamation. An interesting point about the public rejoicings is that the peop:e are not allowed to watch the Imperial procession pass from roofs and windows, as none must look down upon the Emperor.



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Issue 4000. - Vol CXLVII

Dec, 18 1915

Illustrated London News