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The Most Discussed of All the Operations of the Great War: The Attack on the Dardanelles

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/-· -4ti~·Ij· *1 0;· ~- 4. I I-s- – r- SArhST AS A1 .N THE A aq: r· irmilk ALOS A T RVEW TE “Q EE LIABTH N HE DRDNELS T H PRID J URNG W IC SE BO BADD ORS ON CAE HBLE, OERNG TE DVNE F U TOOS


TOWED IN UNDER PROTECTION OF THE FLEETI TOWED IN UNDER PROTECTION OF THE FLEET’S FIRE: A LANDING PARTY GOING TO RINMFORCE THE AUSTRALIANS, NEAR GANA TEE.


Alll — –t ADVANCING TO “IEE ATTACK IN ThE OPE: PART 01 TEE NJAVAL BRIGADE MOVING ACROSS A RIDGE NEAR CAPE HELLES.]


Every war-ship, British and French, engaged in the attack on the Dardanes, has borne its part well in the bombardment of th frts and defences, and in supportng the troops ighting shore, but the “star turn” in the great drama has undoubtedly been that of the “Queen Eliaabeth,” whose tremendous battery of 5-inch guns can hu at each slve practically seven tes of shells. From first to last.” Big Liaie,” as the men in the Fleet call the ship, has played a peculiarly prominent and idispensable part in the Allied at In the opeing shellig of the barrier-forts at either side of the entrance to the Strats, she destroyed one Turkish battery single-handed. After that, firing at from ten to twelve mies’ range, right acroe the bills of the Gallipoli Peninsula, from the Gulf of Saros, the “Queen Elizabeth ” shelled the orts of the arrows, blowing one feet up. On other days she bombarded the principal Turkish forts o


the Narrows from within the Straits, on one occasion, as has been de·cribed, “chaperoing ” a squadron of the older battle-ships while they were in action. At the tipe of the landing of the Army, and in the subequent fighting the “Queen Eliabeth ” rendered invaluable help ith her giant po-b. projectiles, both in covering the boats from the transports, and the disembark- atien on the open beach where possible, and in shelling the enemy’s entreoched positions inland. In the lower left-hand illustration some of the boats carrying landing-parties are seen near Gabe Tape being towed in, protected by the fire of battle-ships and cruisers, to reinforce the Australinas, who were being hard pressed to maintain the foothold they had so heroically won on the fringe of the steep hisides along the shore. In the right-hand lower illutration part of the Naval Brigade are seen advancing to the attack in the open across a ridge near Cape Helis.



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