Home Archive Search Result The Storming of Schwaben Redoubt: British Infantry Carrying the Summit—A Tangle of Trenches and Pits

The Storming of Schwaben Redoubt: British Infantry Carrying the Summit—A Tangle of Trenches and Pits

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The Schwaben Redoubt as one of the strongly fortified positions of the German line, and was the scee of stubborn ighting. Our illntration hows British infantry carrying the slt, where the ground was a tangle of trenches and pits. Thre white fagp were raised at diferent points b the enemy, to indicate the aender of their front ine. Meanwhile, iblated encounters were going on in various plans. In the background is seen the smoke of the Bitish artilesy’s barrage ire, working ahead of the infanty advance. An dfiial brit communique regarding this battle said : ” To-day we attaced the Schwaben Redoubt, most of which is in ar bands. During the past twenty-four hurs in ti area nearly 6oo prisoers have been taken. The Redoubt occupies the rest 5o yards north of Thiepeal, and repesets the highest ground o the Thiepal Spur, with a full view evr the a rther valley ds the Anes,” A day or two later it was ofcially stated : “We increased our gains at Schwen Redoubt, only ma s te pertion o fwhich awemfc s sataen.” Descriing the original attack, a ” T e ”


correspondent writes : “The barrage lifted for a moment, and we knew that the infantaJ were going into that hell of smoke and fire and death. We saw the doud spread northward as our guns increased their range to postions beyond, and, as’ the wind drifted the smoke away, the region on which our storm had first broken came out peacefully into the sunlight again. Our men bad gone beyond it Presently on that same region the enemy’s shells began falling-sure sign that it was our ground now and not his-and still the tide of battle moved on. Ever northward the crtain of our bursting shells passed steadily, until it engulfed only the further side of the Redoubt and down to the German list line on the Ancre. … We breke through the position at the cemetar, and stormed into the Redoubt. … All the ground from here dwn to the valley is a maze of trenches, the German front line which he has held for two years, and all the support lines and comumnication trenches sd strong points with which in that time he has supplied himselL”–(aohn Copyreild ie Y UWd Sloain ed Caoads.]



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