Home Archive Search Result Where Trenches Lost through German "Liquid Fire" Have Been Recaptured: A British Charge at Hooge

Where Trenches Lost through German "Liquid Fire" Have Been Recaptured: A British Charge at Hooge

ORIGINAL WEB VERSION
Close Comments

Leave a Comment

to post a comment.

This 'web version' uses Optical Character Recognition (OCR), to interpret the original printed copy and convert it to computer-readable text. This technology can result in text errors.

. . ;f ` ( t Il l’sk Fd C [ 6t .”‘ ` ay. 4 ýp ABRITISH ADVANCE ATHOOGE: A MAGNIFICENT CHARGE BY THE LIVERPOOL SCOTTISH, AND OTHER REGIMENTS. Th rts oo aeh.i *eebeA 5.. .1… 4,I.-.—..


The British troops have been engaged in sharp fighting round the village and chateau of Hooge, which lie among woods about 21 miles east of Ypres, for the last three months. In his report of August 9, Sir John French announced that the trenches captared by the enemy there on July 3o, through their use of flame-projectors spraying liquid fire, had all been retaken, and that further progress had been made. The British attack at Hooge here illustrated, in which the Liverpool Scottish and other regiments fought with splendid dash and courage, took place, after a preparatory bombardment, in the early hours of June 6. Sir John French reported it as follows: “Early this morning . . we successfully attacked the enemy’s positions north of Hooge. We have occupied the whole of his first-line trenches on a front of sooo yards and also parts of his second line. By noon to-day, 157 prisoners had been passed to our rear. A German counter-attack has been repulsed with heavy loss.” On the 19th, Sir John stated that the number of prisoners taken during the week at Hooge was z23, including 2 officers.


Three machine-guns and a full gas-cylinder were also captured. A soldier who took part in the action of June x6, and supplied our artist with material for his drawing, describing the British charge, writes: “The regiments reached the enemy’s trenches together, leaving some of their men lying between the old lines. Two Germans left their trench and ran towards our men with hands held above their heads. They were, of course, conducted back in safety to a point behind the lines, and were properly cared for . . . One thing was made clear on this day, and that is, that on the point of endurance and courage the German is absolutely no match for the Britisher.” When they had taken the German trenches by an impetuous charge, our men, after establishing themselves, had to endure a fierce bombardment and counter-attacks, which they repelled. It may be mentioned that, in the ” Evening News,” an account was given of the H.A C. taking part, with great gallantry, in a bayonet-charge in the early hours of June 16. The scene of their action, however, was not mentioned. — [Drcmng Copyregt ill tih L’,tld at,,, , ,i C,:a,.l.



Close Comments

Leave a Comment